Nettleseren støttes ikke av khio.no, og siden kan vises feil. Vennligst oppgrader til en moderne nettleser. Hvis dette ikke er mulig, prøv å skru av javascript. Siden vil bli da enklere, men for det meste fungere.

Støttede nettlesere: Chrome 104, Firefox (Android) 101, QQ browser 10.4, UC browser 12.12, Android WebView 104, Baidu 7.12, Chrome 104, Chrome 103, Chrome 102, Edge 104, Edge 103, Firefox 103, Firefox 102, Firefox 91, Firefox 78, Internet Explorer 11, Safari/Chrome (iOS) 15.5, Safari/Chrome (iOS) 15.4, Safari/Chrome (iOS) 15.2-15.3, Safari/Chrome (iOS) 14.5-14.8, Safari/Chrome (iOS) 14.0-14.4, Safari/Chrome (iOS) 12.2-12.5, KaiOS 2.5, Opera Mini, Opera Mobile 64, Opera 89, Opera 88, Safari (MacOS) 15.6, Safari (MacOS) 15.5, Samsung 18.0, Samsung 17.0

Javascript er skrudd av. khio.no bør fungere, men med et enklere grensesnitt.

Forelesning

Tim Ingold, Lecture: “Telling by Hand: Weaving, Drawing, Writing Photography” at Text and Textiles Conference, University of Aberdeen, 2012. Photography by: Patricia Pires Boulhosa.
Tim Ingold, Lecture: “Telling by Hand: Weaving, Drawing, Writing Photography” at Text and Textiles Conference, University of Aberdeen, 2012. Photography by: Patricia Pires Boulhosa.

Design Talk: Art, Science and the Meaning of Research

We invite you to a lecture with Tim Ingold, one of the most renowned voices in contemporary anthropology. He will debate the future of art, design and craft.

British anthropologist and author Tim Ingold has a deep interest in thinking through making and the knowing body and its relationship to research. He holds the Chair of Social Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen and are author of, among others, the books Making: Anthropology, Arcaeology, Art and Architecture and Lines: A Brief History.

Ingold is researching and teaching on the connections between anthropology, archaeology, art and architecture (the '4 As'), conceived as ways of exploring the relations between human beings and the environments they inhabit. Taking an approach radically different from the conventional anthropologies and archaeologies 'of' art and of architecture, which treat artworks and buildings as though they were merely objects of analysis, he is looking at ways of bringing together the 4 As on the level of practice, as mutually enhancing ways of engaging with our surroundings.

Tim Ingold will on his visit also hold a Round Table discussion for invited Research Fellows, teaching staff and invited guests.

This lecture is a contribution in conjuction with the 200 year anniversary at KHiO, by the Design Department. Co-host of the lecture is the Institute of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.